IFP Statement: More details needed on Governor’s tax plan

IOWA CITY, Iowa (Feb. 13, 2017) — The Iowa Fiscal Partnership today released the following statement from Peter Fisher, research director of the nonpartisan Iowa Policy Project, about Governor Kim Reynolds’ tax proposals.

Governor Reynolds today reinforced her commitment to eliminate federal deductibility, which has long distorted a clear picture of what Iowans pay in income taxes. Iowa is one of only six states that permit a state tax deduction for federal taxes paid, and one of only three that allow a 100 percent deduction. Ending that archaic provision is a good start.

So is her proposal to collect sales tax from online retailers, to level the playing field between national retail giants and brick-and-mortar Main Street Business. But there is much to question.

Our initial review indicates her plan misses the mark of what is needed for true, responsible reform of Iowa individual income taxes, let alone the overall system that taxes lower-income Iowans more heavily than the wealthy.

State taxes need to be more fair to low-income Iowans and need to better assure adequate revenue for critical services, such as education. There is no assurance of the latter in the Governor’s plan, which promises cuts in income taxes by $1.7 billion by 2023 with no impact on expected revenue growth; this claim demands more information and scrutiny.

Past analysis has shown Iowa could eliminate federal deductibility and reduce its top rate of income tax below 7 percent while remaining revenue-neutral and — with the right combination of other changes — retain or enhance the fairness of the income tax. Missing from the plan is a crackdown on Iowa’s rampant spending on business tax credits and any effort to plug corporate tax loopholes, which could gain the state as much as $100 million.

The proposal acknowledges that Iowa’s tax system does far less than the federal to acknowledge the cost of raising a family. But nothing is proposed to remedy that problem beyond eliminating federal deductibility; the meager $40 per child “exemption credit” remains.

In addition, the proposal opens a potentially costly — the numbers were not provided — back door to the controversial issue of taxpayer subsidies of private schools, offering a deduction for private K-12 tuition through the 529 plan. Families who already can afford to send their children to a private school would receive a benefit they do not need, at a time public schools are being held back.

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